About Our Beef

glenomaFood doesn’t come from a store; it comes from the land. It is the result of a good deal of patience, quite a bit of luck, and an incredible amount of hard work. In the end, if everything works out all right, good food is harvested and brought to the table as a tribute to all that is nourishing and wholesome.

We believe in the law of the harvest, which states in part that “you reap what you sow.” Because of this, we are completely vested in the welfare of the land, knowing that if we are good to the land, the land will be good to us. It seems that many people today have forgotten this bit of age-old wisdom, and in so doing have disconnected themselves from what the land has to offer.

As a nation we are killing ourselves slowly because of the way we are choosing to use our resources, focusing on the now instead of looking to the future. We know that the land holds the key to our welfare so we treat it with respect. We must remember that although last year’s harvest is beyond our ability to change, we are responsible for the harvests yet to come. Through our example, we hope to remind people that there is a better way to live and that the land is good. We invite you to share in that goodness.

 

Why grass-fed beef?

about_4_1470684103.JPGAll cows eat grass at some point in their lives. However, most cattle are switched off the grass diet for a much more calorie-dense and unnatural grain diet. This is cheaper and quicker, but by no means better.

Our beef doesn’t know what grain is because grain is bad for cows. Our cattle are given only fresh pasture in the spring and summer, and grass hay in the winter. Don’t be fooled by “grass-fed” — make sure it is both grass-fed and grass-finished.

Grass-fed cows are happy cows, and also make for healthier and happier people. Here are just a few of the reasons why:

  • Grass-fed beef contains three times more omega-3 fatty acids than grain-fed beef. Omega-3 fatty acids have been linked to cancer reduction, lowered blood pressure, and healthy brain function.
  • Beta-carotene (a fat-soluble plant pigment which gives grass-fed beef fat its distinctive yellow tint) is a powerful antioxidant and helps the human body to produce vitamin A, which is essential to the function of the immune system.
  • Grass-fed beef is leaner than feedlot beef, yet it contains enough intramuscular fat (fat within the meat fibers) to remain as tender and succulent as the thickly marbled grain-finished beef.

Why us?

why-us.jpgIf you have ever been fortunate enough to partake of food tended and harvested by your own hands, then I know you will have an appreciation for the work we are doing. We are blessed to participate in the miracle of life, helping good things to grow in a way that is good for the land and good for people.

Sweet Water Farm is by no means a high production operation, but the things that it does produce are grown sustainably and in harmony with the times and seasons. Since our cows are allowed to live their lives on clean, open pasture, they are significantly healthier than their feedlot counterparts. This eliminates the need for pesticides and antibiotics, leaving you with beef that is free from questionable chemicals.

Our beef is USDA inspected to ensure a quality product, and dry-aged for at least fourteen days. This process serves to further tenderize the meat, concentrate and improve the meat’s flavor, and reduce shrinkage in meat during the cooking process. Dry-aged beef will also keep longer in your freezer than conventionally processed meat.


If you would like to take part in raising your own food, here is what we have to offer.

Livestock options: Beef, Chicken, Pork, Wild Sheep and Fresh Eggs.

The greenhouse is up! If you have special requests you can email them to me, and we will see what can be done to meet your needs. Check out our harvest schedule to reserve your food, and remember that discounts are available for pre-orders. My email is [email protected].


To read more about grass-fed beef and sustainable eating, please visit one of the following sites:

www.eatwild.com
www.michaelpollan.com